Top 10 Thank You Gifts for Your Jingle Dog. Linda Michaels, M.A., — Del Mar Dog Training

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Linda Michaels MA Del Mar Dog Trainer fall autumn dog

Reward your dog for all the joy and love you get all year!

Our precious pups bring such joy to our lives and deliver unconditional love all year long. Consider saying thank you with gifts that keep on giving throughout the year. Some of these may make you smile — all of them will make your dog smile.

1) Adopt or donate. There is no greater gift. Consider adoption to fill that special place in your forever home, or donate some resources to your local shelter or rescue group.

2) Socialize. Socialize, Socialize! Socialization is the most critical learning activity of all. Begin at 8 weeks of age, if possible or as soon as your new rescue settle into her new home. Participate in socialization activities regularly and frequently. Hang out at Starbucks or run errands together.

3) Gentle leashes. A front-clip harness or a step-in for toy breeds is best. Avoid shock, prong and choke collars. These devices are singled out as equipment to avoid by veterinary behavior experts in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 2006 (“Good trainers: How to identify one.” Vol. 1). They can cause a variety of documented medical injuries (“Gentle Leashes,” 2012. Dr. Peter Dobias, DVM) and may cause aggression. They are illegal in a growing number of countries.

4) Veterinary care. Choose a vet both you and your dog like and trust, one that takes the time to bond with your dog, and practices gentle handling and restraint. Consider integrative care. Ask questions. Spay or neuter. Get that orthopedic bed your dog has been dreaming about.

5) Training. Be sure to use the Hierarchy of Dog Needs. The scientifically endorsed, non-aversive method works for wild animals at progressive zoos and wolfdogs. It can work for your dog, too. It’s effective, long-lasting, safe and fast, as well as truly dog-friendly. Get a private behavioral consultation to target those behavior problems that have cropped up, or enroll in a class.

6) Diet. A super-premium grade food with a specifically named meat as the first ingredient is best. Canine nutritional expert Dr. Doug Knueven DVM, tells us. “There is no greater obstacle to canine health than poor diet.” Venison Holiday Stew (made by Merrick) would be well-received.

7) Exercise. Check out the many great trails, beaches, parks and neighborhoods you can explore together. Consider enrolling in a dog-sport class.

8) Grooming. Choose a groomer who takes the time to make your dog feel safe and practices gentle handling and restraint. Would your dog appreciate a spa massage treatment or a blueberry facial?

9) Environmental enhancement. Rotate food-toys, interactive puzzles and safe chew-items to keep your dog busy and happy. Add a window with a view and dog-friendly landscaping. Don’t forget to provide a quiet place where you dog can rest away from all the excitement of the holiday season.

10) Your love. Infuse all the above with your love — the best gift of all.

Linda Michaels, “Dog Psychologist,” M.A./Psychology a Top Ten Rated U.S. Dog Trainer — Del Mar Dog Training, may be reached at 858.259.9663 (WOOF) or by email: LindaMichaelsPositively@gmail.com  for private manners/obedience instruction and behavioral consultations near Del Mar and the San Diego Coast. Please visit us at DogPsychologistOnCall.com  Linda is the creator of the Hierarchy of Dog Needs All rights reserved.

Originally published UT San Diego, Scratch ‘n Sniff. Chris Ross, Editor

Related Articles:

Top 10 Ways to Say Thank You to Your Dog Part I. By Linda Michaels, M.A., Rancho Santa Fe Review.

Top 10 Ways to Say Thank You to Your Dog Part II. By Linda Michaels, M.A., Rancho Santa Fe Review.

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About

Linda Michaels, M.A. Psychology, Del Mar Dog Training, serves clients in Del Mar and San Diego County from La Jolla to Carlsbad, plus Rancho Santa Fe, Hollywood, and Beverly Hills. Linda Michaels was recently rated one of the top ten dog trainers in the United States, by Top Ten Magazine. Linda has a master’s degree in Experimental Psychology (Hons), and is the creator of the Hierarchy of Dog Needs™ (HDN). She focuses on the psychological aspects of dog behavior that often mirror human psychological conditions, such as: fear, separation/attachment disorders, and aggression toward humans and other dogs. She also teaches private, customized basic manners/obedience lessons for dogs of all ages and every breed.

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